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Government Liability Accidents in Boulder, CO

When a vehicle accident occurs in Colorado, the negligent driver may be liable for damages. In a dog bite accident, the owner may be liable for damages. However, when the state, county, or city government causes harm through their negligence (or the negligence of their employees), compensation may be limited by the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act.  If you have questions about a possible claim, contact the personal injury team at Tenge Law Firm today. What Is the Colorado Governmental Immunity Act? Under CRS 24-10-109, state and local Colorado governments and their employees have immunity from certain personal injury claims. The Colorado Governmental Immunity Act (CGIA) also provides some exceptions to the general rules. This is why it is important to seek legal counsel from an experienced Colorado attorney who understands CRS 24-10-109  if you are bringing a personal injury claim against the Colorado government.  Who Is Protected Under CGIA? The Colorado Governmental Immunity Act protects various government employees and public entities from lawsuits for personal injury, including: The State of Colorado, Counties in Colorado, Municipalities in Colorado, Cities in Colorado, Employees of the public entity, Officers of the public entity, Any health care practitioner of the public entity, Authorized volunteers of the public entity, Servants of the public entity, Colorado school districts, Special improvement districts, and Public colleges and universities. Protections also broadly cover any other district, agency, instrumentality, or political subdivision of the state.  Waivers of Immunity for Negligence Under CRS 24-10-106 Claims against Colorado government entities and employees are generally barred under the theory of sovereign immunity. The concept of sovereign immunity is generally justified because unlimited claims against the government would be a financial burden to taxpayers who ultimately absorb the cost.  However, it is understood that in some cases, it is proper that the government be responsible for damages due to negligence. Waiver of immunity occurs for actions arising from the following: The operation of a public hospital or correctional facility; The operation of a motor vehicle by a public employee while performing duties in the course of employment; A dangerous condition of a public highway, street, or road impacting traffic;  The maintenance and operation of any public water, electrical, gas, sanitation, power, or swimming facility; A dangerous condition of any public building; The operation and maintenance of a qualified state capital asset that is the subject of a leveraged leasing agreement; or A dangerous condition caused by snow and ice accumulation physically interfering with public access to public buildings and businesses.   In these situations, the injured party has the legal right to file a lawsuit against the government entity for failing to address dangerous conditions causing personal injury.  Filing a Claim for Colorado Governmental Immunity Act Exemptions If your injury occurred due to negligence under any of the aforementioned circumstances, you may be eligible to seek compensation. It is important to note that the statute of limitations under CRS 24-10 is much shorter than for other personal injuries. Most personal injury cases allow two years from the date of the incident for the victim to file a claim. The CGIA only allows 182 days.  Notice Requirements for Claims Against Colorado Government Written notice is required before an injured party can file a claim against a Colorado government agency or employee. You need to submit the notice within 182 days of the accident or discovery of the injury. The written notice will include: Name and address of the injured party and their attorney; A statement about the facts of the claim including details such as date, time, place, circumstances of the negligent act or omission;  The name and address of public employees involved; A statement regarding the nature and extent of the injuries suffered; and The amount of monetary compensation being requested.  The state has 90 days to file a response to the notice. If the claim is denied or no response is received, the injured individual may file a lawsuit.  How Can a Colorado Attorney Help with Your CGIA Case? Tenge Law Firm has been representing Colorado personal injury clients for nearly three decades. Our attorneys understand the Colorado legal system including proper timing, notifications, filings, and all the ways that the government tries to restrict negligence claims rather than compensate you for your injuries. You deserve to know your options. You don’t have long to file Colorado Governmental Immunity Act cases before the opportunity expires. Call us at (303) 963-9292 to schedule your free case consultation, or use our convenient online contact form to learn more about our track record of success.

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Different Examples of Personal Injury Cases: Do You Qualify?

Personal injury cases arise when one person suffers an injury or damage due to the negligent, careless, or intentional act of another person or entity. There are many types of personal injury cases, most of which center around the presence of negligence.  When one party owes a duty of care to another party and breaches that duty, they are considered negligent. If the negligence causes injury to another party, they may be legally liable for damages.  If you have questions about a possible claim, contact the personal injury team at Tenge Law Firm today. Personal Injury Case Examples  Though there are many types of personal injury cases, there are a handful that come up repeatedly. Here are some of the most common personal injury case examples.  Vehicle Accidents  The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) reports that there were 33,244 fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States in 2019 in which 36,096 deaths occurred. Colorado had 544 fatal crashes. If you have been injured in an auto accident that was not your fault, it is important to contact a personal injury attorney to learn more about your options. Insurance coverage and fault play a big part in your ability to receive a fair settlement in Colorado. Auto accidents also include those involving pedestrians, motorcycles, and bicycles. Medical Malpractice You should always feel like you can trust your healthcare provider, but not every provider adheres to the same standards. Medical malpractice is more common than anyone would like to believe. Common types of medical malpractice include: Surgical errors, Misdiagnosis, Delayed diagnosis, Medication errors, Childbirth injuries, Failure to treat, and Anesthesia errors. Never take medical malpractice personal injury cases lightly. Medical errors can be life-altering.  Slip and Fall Accidents Slipping and falling on a banana peel is only funny in cartoons. Actual slip and fall injuries can cause serious harm. You may be able to pursue a premises liability claim after a slip and fall accident. The National Floor Safety Institute states that falls account for over 8 million hospital emergency room visits, representing the leading cause of visits (21.3%). Falling can be especially detrimental to people over 65 years of age. Many people fall because of someone else’s failure to create a safe environment for walking. Examples include wet floors, broken railing, or poorly maintained walkways.  Wrongful Death When a negligent action leads to the death of a loved one, you may have a wrongful death claim. Family members can file a lawsuit for wrongful death to help with medical and funeral expenses along with other financial burdens such as loss of income or employment benefits. Non-economic damages are also available to compensate for the loss of enjoyment of life.  Product Liability A consumer who is injured by a defective product may have a claim for product liability. Personal injury case examples for product liability vary depending on what was wrong. This cause of action arises from one or more of the following defects: A manufacturing defect resulting from an error on the assembly line at the factory; A design defect that makes the entire line of products unreasonably dangerous: or A marketing defect, which can include a failure to warn consumers about inherent risks or lack of appropriate use instructions.  These types of personal injury cases are generally brought against the company that produced the product.  Workplace Injury The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports 2.7 million nonfatal private industry workplace injuries and illnesses in 2020. This statistic excludes fatalities and injuries to government employees. Many personal injury case examples stem from injuries that occur during the course of employment. Filing a workers’ compensation claim is often the first step, but it may take a lawsuit to get you the compensation you are entitled to.  Personal Injury Settlement Amount Examples The amount of compensation received for personal injury cases depends on the circumstances of the accident and the severity of the injuries. These can vary from thousands to millions. Here are some personal injury settlement examples from Tenge Law Firm: Product liability defective roof – $3,250,000.00 Auto accident with head and neck injuries – $1,475,000.00 Wrongful death automobile accident – $525,000.00 Construction accident workplace injury – $460,000.00 Retail store slip and fall – $375,000.00 While your claim won’t necessarily be worth the same as these examples, this can give you an idea of the results we are capable of. Contact Us Today Tenge Law Firm has nearly 30 years of experience representing victims in all types of personal injury cases. We invite you to check out more of our personal injury case examples and settlements so that you can be confident in our ability to fight for the compensation you deserve. Contact us today for your free case consultation, and learn more about how we can help you.

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Will I Have to Go to Court for a Car Accident Settlement in Boulder?

The thought of filing a lawsuit after you have been injured in a car accident can seem overwhelming. It may ease some of your worries to have a better understanding of your options and when to consider going to court for a car accident settlement. If you have questions about a possible claim, contact the personal injury team at Tenge Law Firm today. Colorado at-Fault Insurance Colorado is one of the majority of states that recognize fault as a factor in receiving insurance compensation. In some states, you file a claim with your own insurance rather than the responsible party’s insurance. In Colorado, you have the option of having the person who caused the accident pay the cost of medical expenses and property damage. This also means that you must determine who caused the accident. If there is contention over fault, consider seeking legal counsel.  Auto Insurance Requirements in Colorado Without insurance, the victim of a vehicle accident might not have means for recovery. The minimum amount of bodily injury liability required coverage in Colorado is $25,000 per person and $50,000 per accident. The minimum amount of property damage coverage is $15,000 per accident.  Insurers are responsible to compensate you, up to the policy limits, for damages caused by their insured. This includes pain and suffering along with other non-economic damages. Insurance companies may try to omit these damages from your settlement, in which case your attorney will send a demand letter requesting their inclusion. You may have to file a vehicle accident lawsuit if the company does not offer a fair settlement and possibly even take the case all the way to trial. Unfortunately, if a serious injury occurs, you may require more than the policy limits to cover current and future expenses. You deserve to be fully compensated. This may require suing the negligent person directly or seeking other sources of recovery. Your attorney can help you understand your options and maximize your compensation. Settling Disputes Through Negotiation If you choose to pursue litigation, you will not necessarily end up with your car accident lawsuit going to trial. Your vehicle accident lawsuit will go through a pretrial process. Negotiation is a key factor in the process. You make a settlement offer and the defendant may counter. Generally, this negotiation process is conducted by the attorneys for both sides, with the goal of reaching a settlement that is agreeable to both parties. If an agreement can not be reached, you may find yourself going to court for a car accident vehicle settlement. The majority of vehicle accident lawsuits settle during pretrial negotiations.  Filing a Vehicle Accident Lawsuit Under Colorado Revised Statutes 13-80-101, you have three years from the date of the accident to file a lawsuit, but waiting that long can make it more difficult to succeed. Going to court for a car accident settlement could help maximize your claim. In that case, the judge and jury are responsible for determining the compensation you truly deserve.  Proving negligence is a crucial component of receiving adequate compensation. Colorado follows a modified comparative negligence rule. This means that you can still recover as long as you are not more than 50% responsible for the accident.  Hiring a Vehicle Accident Attorney If you have been injured in a vehicle accident, you want the simplest path forward with the best result. Tenge Law Firm has been handling personal injury cases in Boulder for nearly 30 years. We understand the Colorado legal system and the best way to get you the compensation you are entitled to. Call us today at (303) 963-9292 for your free consultation. You can also connect with us through our online contact form. We don’t charge any fees unless you receive compensation.

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How to Report a Drunk Driver in Colorado

Seeing a vehicle swerving on the road and heading in your direction frightens all drivers. You immediately wonder if the driver is impaired. Drunk drivers kill more than 10,000 people annually in the United States. Each state has its own set of consequences for driving impaired. If you have been injured by a drunk driver or even if you suspect one is on the road, you should know how to report a drunk driver in Colorado.  If you have questions about a possible claim, contact the personal injury team at Tenge Law Firm today. Colorado Drunk Driving Statistics Backgroundchecks.org identifies Colorado as the thirteenth most dangerous state for drunk driving accidents. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1,548 people were killed in crashes involving an alcohol-impaired driver in Colorado from 2009 to 2018. Colorado’s driving impairment death rates by age nearly mirror national averages with the largest number of deaths in the 21 to 34 age range. A survey conducted by Behavioral Risk Surveillance Systems reported that 1.7% of adults nationally reported driving after drinking too much, compared to 1.8% statewide in Colorado. Nearly one in three traffic deaths in the United States involves a driver with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08% or higher Common Signs of Drunk Driving  When you report a drunk driver in Colorado you are helping keep your loved ones and your community safe. Accidents happen, but there are often signs that indicate you are sharing the road with someone who is not fit to drive. Here are some things to look out for: Swerving or zig-zagging across the road,  Quick changes in acceleration,  Driving on the wrong side of the road,  Tailgating,  Crossing the center lane,  Stopping or braking without cause,  Driving without headlights at night,  Nearly striking an object or another vehicle,  Driving 10 miles or more under the speed limit,  Inappropriate use of signals,  Driving somewhere other than the road.  In general, any irregular driving behavior could indicate intoxication. You do not have to know with certainty that a driver is under the influence to report a drunk driver.  How to Report a Drunk Driver To report a drunk driver in Colorado, simply call 911. If you do not have a voice-activated service in your vehicle, pull over before placing the call. You also have the option of dialing  *DUI (star 384) to reach the drunk driving hotline or *CSP (star 277) to reach the Colorado State Patrol. The dispatcher will request the following information:  The exact location of the driver when you saw them, including the road and any cross streets; The direction they were headed; Description of the vehicle, including the make, model, and color; The driving behavior that caused your concern; and  The license plate number if you were able to see it.  Whatever information you can provide will be helpful and potentially save lives. Never assume that someone else is going to call to report a drunk driver. Injured by a Drunk Driver? If you were in an accident with a drunk driver, it’s crucial that you report the incident. Though drunk driving is a criminal charge, you may also be eligible to file a civil claim to be compensated for your injuries. There is never an excuse for driving intoxicated, and you should not have to be responsible for injuries you sustained due to someone else’s negligent behavior. The experienced legal team at Tenge Law Firm, LLC, has been representing Colorado car accident victims for nearly three decades. Our creative, dedicated Boulder personal injury attorneys have won numerous multi-million dollar awards and settlements for clients, and we are here to help you fight for what you deserve. Contact us for your free consultation.

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How to Include Negligence in Your Personal Injury Claim?

If you were harmed because of the negligence, carelessness, or intentional action of another person or company, you may have a personal injury claim. Negligence is the primary cause of action for personal injury claims whether your injury was caused by a car accident, premise liability, workplace accident, medical malpractice, or product liability.  If you have questions about a possible claim, contact the personal injury team at Tenge Law Firm today. How to Sue a Company for Negligence If your injury was related to the action or inaction of a company, you may be entitled to compensation. Suing a company is much like filing a lawsuit against an individual. But it’s important to remember that big companies often have readily available legal resources and employ tactics to overwhelm you and burden you financially. When you are determining how to sue a company for negligence, consider seeking counsel from an experienced negligence lawyer.  Defining Negligence in Colorado  There are four elements to a negligence claim. Each element must be present in an actionable personal injury lawsuit.  Duty The first element of negligence is that the defendant owes a legal duty of care to the injured party. The underlying duty is to act with reasonable care to protect you from harm.  Breach An unfulfilled duty of care is a legal breach of the duty. For example, if a car crashes into you while speeding, the driver of that car has breached the duty to drive according to traffic laws.  Causation Proving causation can be one of the more difficult components of negligence because you must demonstrate that the injury you suffered was caused by the defendant’s breach of duty. Defendants may argue that the injury or damage was already present or that the cause was something entirely different.  Damages or Harm Actual damages or harm must be present if you are to succeed on a negligence claim. Establishing the amount of damages is an important step in receiving the compensation you deserve. Different Classifications of Negligence Though the elements of negligence remain the same, there are different types of negligence claims and defenses.  Gross Negligence Gross negligence is a serious form of negligence, most often associated with medical malpractice law. The negligent behavior here is reckless and not in line with the conduct of a reasonable person. A doctor who operates on the wrong body part may be liable for gross negligence.  Vicarious Liability Negligence Vicarious liability negligence applies when someone is indirectly responsible for the damage that occurred. It generally arises where liability is assigned to someone who did not cause the injury but who had a legal relationship with the one who did (e.g., husband and wife, parent and child, employer and employee, vehicle owner, and vehicle driver). Modified Comparative Negligence  Under Colorado’s modified comparative negligence law, damages awarded are reduced by the percentage by which the plaintiff contributes to the accident. A plaintiff found responsible for 50 percent or more of the accident, receives no compensation. This applies to all negligence cases in Colorado and is another reason that hiring an experienced negligence lawyer is so important.  Recovering Damages from Your Personal Injury Claim Determining how to sue a company for negligence starts with understanding how the circumstances of your case align with Colorado’s negligence law. The team at Tenge Law Firm, LLC, is ready to help you sort through the facts of your case and determine the best legal strategy. We specialize in serious personal injury and insurance claims. Contact us for your free case consultation.

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Colorado Moped Laws

Riding around Boulder or Denver on a moped is fun and efficient. It costs so much less to travel with a moped. Not only will you pay less in gas, but it’s also easier to get around during high traffic times, not to mention how easy it is to find parking for your moped. Mopeds are a different type of vehicle than a passenger car or truck, so the moped laws in Colorado are different. Moped owners and users need to understand the laws that explain the rules of the road for mopeds. You don’t want to get a ticket by doing something illegal with your moped. You also want to be a safe driver and not get into a moped accident. What Is a Moped? Under Colorado law, mopeds are called low-powered scooters and are defined as self-propelled vehicles that have no more than three wheels on the road. If the moped has an engine, it can’t have more than 50cc of power. If it is an electric scooter, then it can’t have more than 4476 watts available. Do You Need a Special Scooter License? Colorado’s scooter laws do not require a special license to operate a moped. All you need is a valid driver’s license to operate a moped legally. But similar to a regular vehicle, you must register your scooter with the state and cover the moped with proper insurance. Don’t just assume your personal vehicle auto insurance will cover your scooter. In many cases, automobile insurance policies apply only to vehicles with four wheels. It’s a good idea to contact your insurance company and ask about what insurance coverage they offer that specifically covers mopeds. Do You Have to Wear a Helmet? Similar to motorcycle laws, moped laws in Colorado do not require riders to wear helmets. If you are an adult, you don’t have to wear a helmet while riding a scooter or a motorcycle. Minors 17 years and younger must wear a helmet, whether they are driving the scooter or whether they are a passenger on the scooter. Nevertheless, we highly recommend that you wear a helmet when riding on a scooter, motorcycle, or bicycle. One of the major injuries we see with moped accidents and crashes are traumatic brain injuries that may not have occurred if the scooter rider was wearing a proper helmet. Are There Any Restrictions on Where You Can Drive a Scooter? Colorado scooter laws restrict scooter use on interstate highways. Otherwise, you can ride a scooter anywhere you can drive a car or truck. You cannot ride a moped on sidewalks or designated pedestrian walkways. However, moped laws in Colorado allow for the use of mopeds in designated bicycle lanes. The Colorado Car Accident Lawyers at Tenge Law Firm, LLC, Are Here to Help Seriously Injured People If you have been seriously injured while riding a moped or scooter, then you are entitled to compensation for your injuries. Moped accidents can be very severe due to the fact that there’s not much protection between you and the other vehicle or the hard road. This is where the skilled and knowledgeable Colorado car accident lawyers at Tenge Law Firm, LLC, come into play. With 5 out of 5 stars from lawyer rating services like AVVO, Lawyers.com, and Yelp, we have the experience and resources to fight for your rights to get the full and fair compensation you deserve. Contact us online or call us today at 303-536-7675 to schedule your free consultation. With offices in Denver, Boulder, and Fort Collins, Tenge Law Firm, LLC, represents injured clients throughout Colorado.

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A Guide to Torts

“Tort” is a strange word that has a very straightforward meaning. It is a French term adopted by English courts that means a “wrong” or “injury.” In American law, it is a catchall phrase for a civil wrong that results in injury to another. In its essence, a tort is an act or omission by one person that results in the harm or injury to another. Understanding how an act or omission results in liability for an injury depends on the type of tort committed. There are three generally recognized torts:  Negligence,  Intentional, and  Strict liability.   Below we have provided a guide to each type to help you better understand your rights and how you may have been wronged.  Negligence A tort in negligence focuses on a person’s conduct and has little to do with their intentions. The analysis is whether an act or omission of a person fell below a reasonable standard of care which that person owed to another. As a result, a person can be liable for an injury even if they did not intend to harm anyone. Negligence cases focus on the concepts of “duty,” “standard of care,” and “reasonableness.” A few examples of torts in negligence would be: Bicycle accidents, Car accidents, Slip and fall, and Medical malpractice. Negligence torts can vary widely, so if you don’t see one that applies to your case, please contact us.  Intentional In contrast to a tort in negligence, an intentional tort focuses exclusively on intent and almost completely disregards any consideration of “care.” In other words, did the person intend to act in a certain way and did that act harm another? A further important layer to the analysis is whether the person knew or should have known that their act would cause the injury. States formally recognize several types of intentional torts such as: Trespass, Intentional infliction of emotional distress, Battery, Assault, and Conversion of property. Note that several of these intentional torts may also be treated as crimes under criminal law. Strict Liability Strict liability torts do not generally focus on either a standard of care or intent. In strict liability tort cases, the analysis is whether a person committed the act, and if the act was committed, then liability generally results. Strict liability cases are applied to a narrow field of topics such as: Defective products, Defective medications and medical devices, Animal bites, and Abnormally dangerous activities. While strict liability torts may seem simple, many factors are needed to prove a personal injury case under strict liability. Contact a Top Law Firm Near Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collins on Tort Law At the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, we treat each case as if it is our only case. Our attorneys in Colorado have decades of experience in tort cases and have won millions of dollars in awards and settlements.  The Tenge Law Firm, LLC, is uniquely positioned to help you find the justice you deserve and the compensation for your injuries that you are entitled to. Call us today for a free consultation. 

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Do I Need a Colorado Personal Injury Lawyer?

Not all personal injury claims require the assistance of a lawyer. Some are unwinnable, while others are trivial. It is important, however, that you understand when you need a personal injury lawyer, when you don’t, and how a Colorado personal injury lawyer can help you obtain the justice you deserve.  How a Personal Injury Lawyer Can Help You An experienced personal injury lawyer can help you in the following ways, among others: Provide an objective evaluation of your claimーsomething you might need while you are struggling with overwhelming emotions; Advise you on how to maximize the value of your claimーby staying off social media, for example; Conduct an investigation of your claim; Gather admissible evidence for use both in court and at the negotiating table; Find expert witnesses to bolster your claim; Negotiate your claim with the insurance company or the defendant; Find legal holes in the defendant’s evidence and arguments; Advise you on possible alternative courses of action; and Draft a formal complaint and file a lawsuit on your behalf (useful even if you never go to court). Above all, your attorney can take care of legal and financial matters for you, so you can concentrate on regaining your health.   Do I Need a Personal Injury Lawyer? Seven Signs That Say You Do There is no formula that can tell you for sure whether you need legal assistance. Under the following circumstances, however, you are likely to need a personal injury lawyer.  1. Your Injuries Are Long-Term or Permanent Some injuries leave you with permanent disfigurement. Others, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), can leave you with long-term disability. Still, other injuries might leave you with the need for long-term medical care or rehabilitation. In such cases, especially, the latter case, you may need an experienced personal injury attorney to help you estimate future medical expenses. You are also likely to need an attorney for a wrongful death claim. 2. The Insurance Company Rejects Your Claim or Offers a Paltry Settlement Most insurance companies would reject almost any claim if they thought they could get away with it. One of the ways you know that the insurance company doesn’t respect you is when they either dismiss your claim or offer you a settlement that is so low you can’t decide whether to laugh or cry. 3. The Insurance Company Is Dealing with You in Bad Faith  Bad faith means, essentially, dishonestly. Although the law prohibits insurance companies from dealing with you in bad faith, it happens all the time. Some bad faith insurance company tactics include: Stalling you with numerous small delays; Providing you with misleading information; Requiring you to provide excess documentation; Aggressively pursuing an unfairly low settlement offer; and Dismissing your claim without discussion or with blithe and simplistic answers. Of course, this is just the tip of the iceberg. Trust your gut instincts if you think the insurance company is treating you unfairly.  4. The Insurance Company or the Defendant Is Trying to Blame Your for the Accident Because of Colorado’s comparative fault system, many insurance companies seek ways to blame the victim for the accident, so that they can escape liability themselves.  Insurance company representative: “Please tell me the EXACT time of the accident.” (for the 50th time). You (exasperated): “OK, OK, the accident happened at EXACTLY 2:42 pm.” Insurance company: So you caused the accident yourself, by checking the time when you should have been watching the road.”  5. Liability Is in Dispute The defendant will always come up with some argument that they are somehow not responsible for your damages. You are going to need a personal injury lawyer, however, when the facts put liability in real dispute and you are not sure whether it is you or the other party who is the real defendant.  6. You Are Not Sure How Much Your Claim Is Worth You might not realize how much of the typically successful personal injury claim consists of intangible, non-economic damages such as pain and suffering, mental anguish, and loss of consortium. You could drastically underestimate the value of your claim if you ignore these components of your damages. 7. Your Claim Is Complex Some personal injury claims are simple, while others are complex. Your claim might involve multiple parties, for example. Likewise, your claim might be scientifically complex. Product liability claims, for example, are often quite scientifically complex, and proving your claim might require the use of an expert witness.  We’re Ready for Action Here at Tenge Law, we put our money where our mouth is. Indeed, we have recovered more than $50 million for our clients over the last seven years alone. Although it would be unethical of us to guarantee results in any particular case, we can guarantee you this much—retain us and your case will be in good hands.  Call The Tenge Law Firm, LLC, 24/7 at 303-536-7686 or contact us online to get started pursuing your claim today.

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Questions To Ask A Personal Injury Lawyer in CO

Having the Right Lawyer Gives You the Best Chance to Recover for Your Injuries Suffering an injury at the hands of another person can seriously disrupt your life. An injury caused because of another’s negligence is likely to force you out of work while medical bills pile up.  You know you need help from a lawyer. The problem is that there are many injury lawyers. How do you know which one you should choose? At Tenge Law Firm, LLC, we believe in devoting all our attention to our clients’ needs. We strive to provide support for our clients through some of their toughest times. We also fight hard for our clients to get the best result possible in the shortest amount of time.  How Do You Know You Have the Right Colorado Personal Injury Lawyer for Your Case? Every lawyer out there believes they can do the job for you. Which one is right for you? You might get referrals from numerous friends and family.  They mean well and want the best for you, but they could steer you in the wrong direction.  How do you figure out which lawyer is the best one for your case? Remember, your case is as unique as you are. You have to do some research, and you should also talk to a couple different lawyers before deciding. Feel free to ask as many questions as you like. If the lawyer doesn’t want to answer them or isn’t comfortable with them, then you probably don’t want that lawyer representing you. What Are Some Questions to Ask a Personal Injury Lawyer? There are a lot of questions you should ask any attorney you talk to about your Colorado personal injury case. Taking the time to get to know the lawyer before committing to hiring the lawyer is a smart move. You get one shot at recovering damages. So you need to make sure that you have the right lawyer for the job. I’m Out of Work and Can’t Afford to Pay a Lawyer. How Am I Going to Pay Your Fee? We get this question all the time. It makes sense to ask. Anyone who suffered a serious injury in an accident probably can’t afford to hire a lawyer. That’s why Colorado personal injury lawyers from Tenge Law, LLC, work only on a contingency fee. Don’t worry. We put our entire agreement in writing, so you know exactly what to expect. A contingency fee is a simple arrangement: if you win, we win. We won’t take a fee unless you win a settlement or judgment. Also, we advance all your costs. We recover them from your award. That way, you never have to worry about digging into your pocket to fund your case. We do it for you.  What Kind of Experience Do You Have? Most lawyers are ready to tout their accomplishments. A lawyer you can trust with your case has handled cases like yours. Although every case is different, there are some similarities in the types of cases lawyers handle.  You also need to know if the lawyer you’re talking with about your case has jury trial experience. There are a lot of lawyers who have never tried a case before. You have to wonder why. Will the lawyer settle for less than the case is worth out of fear of going to trial?  You want a lawyer who has trial experience and is not afraid to let the jury decide. That doesn’t mean you will have to go to trial. A lawyer with trial experience can push for a great settlement because the other side knows they will not settle for less.  An experienced Colorado personal injury attorney knows how to prepare a case for trial. Rigorous preparation and anticipation that every case will go to a jury usually lead to favorable results. Who’s Handling My Case? When you talk with a lawyer about your case, you expect that attorney will represent you. That’s not always the case. At Tenge Law, LLC, you will have the benefit of all our firm’s talent and resources. However, you will have one attorney dedicated to you and your best interests. We don’t pass your file onto a junior attorney to work on. Instead, your attorney from Tenge Law, LLC, will be with you every step of the way. How Much Is My Case Worth? That’s the magic question. You should want to know the answer. There is no science to translating human loss and suffering into dollar amounts. It’s comparing apples and oranges.  A knowledgeable personal injury lawyer will consider lots of factors when trying to answer this question.  Economic Damages There are some damage amounts you can put a dollar figure on. The law refers to those as “economic damages.” Economic damages often include: Property damage, Medical bills, Future medical costs, Lost wages or salary, and Future economic losses. This list is only an example. You might have other economic damages in your case. Non-Economic Damages The law recognizes other types of damages as well. Non-economic damages are those losses on which you can’t put a dollar amount on. Non-economic damages are pain and suffering, emotional losses, psychological suffering, loss of consortium, or loss of companionship. Exemplary Damages Your case might involve punitive or exemplary damages as well. Punitive damages, as the name suggests, punish the defendant for their actions. Punitive damages are not available in every case. But you should discuss the possibility with your lawyer.  A knowledgeable and creative attorney might be able to make an argument that you deserve punitive damages on top of economic and non-economic damages. Why Should I Hire Tenge Law, LLC, for My Colorado Personal Injury Case? We appreciate this question because it gives us a chance to talk about all the good we’ve done for our clients over the past 25 years. In the last seven years alone, we’ve won over $50 million in damages for our clients. How do we do it? We care—a lot....

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Allstate Bad-Faith Insurance Claims in Colorado

If you’ve been injured in an accident, you may know that dealing with insurance companies can be almost as scary as the accident itself. But did you know that all insurance companies in the U.S. owe you a duty of good faith and fair dealing? That’s right! And this duty likely applies to both your insurance company and the insurance company of the party that injured you. If you think you may have been the victim of Allstate’s bad-faith practices in resolving an accident or injury insurance claim, we may be able to help. The duty of good faith and fair dealing means that companies like Allstate need to act fairly in handling claims. This includes processing, investigating, and making decisions about insurance claims. Our team at the Tenge Law Firm, LLC., has helped many Coloradans like you handle personal injury claims—and the Allstate insurance lawsuits that sometimes arise as a result of a poorly handled claim. What Is Bad Faith? The State of Colorado takes bad-faith insurance practices very seriously. In fact, Allstate has been held liable for its bad-faith insurance practices in Colorado courts many times. The issues in these cases have had to do with a variety of policies and practices. But the courts’ rulings always came down to the same thing: Allstate’s alleged bad-faith actions. If you live in Colorado and think you’ve been harmed by Allstate’s failure to investigate your claim, we can help you understand your rights. The Tenge Law Firm’s goal is to achieve justice for injured parties, and that includes fighting for the insurance benefits you deserve. Who Is Allstate? The Allstate Corporation is a multi-billion dollar insurance brand and operates many insurance companies in the United States. You may not even realize that the insurance company you’re fighting with on the other end of the phone is Allstate. For instance, some of the brands that Allstate owns and operates that don’t carry the Allstate name include:  Esurance; Encompass Insurance Company; Castle Key Insurance Company; and American Heritage Life Insurance Company. After a serious accident, you may not even be aware that you’re dealing with a notoriously difficult insurance company. Experienced personal injury counsel can help you understand how to navigate both the insurance companies and the law.  When Would I Encounter an Allstate Bad Faith Issue? If you’re ever in an accident and need to file an insurance claim, you might encounter an Allstate bad-faith issue. The company’s former employees once notoriously disclosed the fact that Allstate used a “three Ds” strategy—deny, delay, and defend—to line its pockets with money that rightfully belonged to claimants. If you’ve ever filed a claim under any of the following policies held by Allstate, you may find yourself on the receiving end of a bad-faith “three Ds” strategy: Auto or motorcycle insurance; Recreational vehicle insurance; Homeowner, renter, and condo insurance; Business insurance; Life insurance; and Supplemental health insurance. Don’t get caught out when you need the support of insurance funds the most. Make sure that after you’ve sought medical attention for an injury, you call an experienced Colorado personal injury attorney before speaking to the insurance company.  How the Tenge Law Firm Can Help – Offices in Denver, Boulder, and Fort Collins For almost 30 years, J. Todd Tenge and his team have been helping folks like you fight for their rights after an accident. The Tenge Law Firm team can help you understand your rights in an Allstate bad-faith lawsuit. Contact us today to discuss your claims.

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