| Read Time: 3 minutes | Blog

How to Report Reckless Driving in Boulder

While you may be a very safe driver and always drive defensively to avoid an accident, there’s no guarantee that other drivers will act the same. Sadly, not everyone worries about causing harm to others. Some people drive while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or they may drive recklessly, both of which endanger others. When you spot someone being unsafe, you have the right to report reckless driving in Colorado. If a reckless driver hits you and you sustain injuries, speak with a skilled Boulder car accident lawyer at Tenge Law Firm, LLC. What Is Considered Reckless Driving in Colorado? Under Colorado Revised Statute 42-4-1401, the law defines reckless driving as someone who drives a motor vehicle, bicycle, electric-assisted bicycle, or low-power scooter in a way that demonstrates a wanton or willful disregard for other people’s safety or property. The offending driver could face criminal charges because reckless driving is a class two misdemeanor offense in Colorado. For the first reckless driving conviction, the driver could be fined up to $300 and spend anywhere between 10 to 90 days in jail. If they are convicted of a second offense, the fine is between $50 and $1,000, 10 days to six months in jail, or a combination of both. Reckless driving is not the same as careless driving. Careless driving isn’t as severe but could result in a misdemeanor as well. How to Report Reckless Driving in Colorado According to the Colorado Department of Transportation, there were 574 fatal crashes in 2020. This number was up from the year before, with 545 fatal crashes in 2019. Reckless driving certainly plays a role in the number of fatalities on Colorado roads. You can call “CSP” or 227 from your cell phone to report a potentially reckless or impaired driver to a Colorado State Patrol dispatcher. When you speak with the dispatcher, be prepared to give them your exact location (as best you can), what direction and road the reckless driver is traveling on, and a description of the vehicle. You will also need to explain how the driver was maneuvering their vehicle and why you suspect they are reckless or impaired. Look for Signs of a Potentially Reckless or Impaired Driver It’s essential to know what to look for when spotting a reckless or impaired driver in Boulder. Common examples of reckless driving include: Tailgating; Racing other vehicles; Speeding excessively; Refusing to let other vehicles pass; Passing other cars illegally; and Ignoring traffic signals and other signs. Learn how to spot a driver who may be under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Some of the most common behaviors of someone driving drunk include: Weaving, drifting, or swerving; Appearing drunk, which could be visibly drinking in the car, eye fixation, or driving with their face close to the windshield; Responding slowly to traffic lights; Almost hitting an object or another vehicle; Driving well under the speed limit for seemingly no reason; Stopping without reason or braking erratically; Driving without headlights at night;   Turning abruptly; and Driving in more than one lane or with the left tires on the centerline. If you suspect someone is driving under the influence of alcohol, you should report them. It could save another motorist’s life. Any one of these actions could cause an accident, but when combined, it could be deadly. Contact a Boulder Car Accident Lawyer Today If you sustained injuries in a car accident caused by another driver’s negligence or recklessness, you have rights. Contact Tenge Law Firm, LLC., to schedule a consultation. We have decades of experience assisting injured victims just like you recover the compensation they are entitled to following an injury accident. Let us help protect your rights and ensure the responsible parties are held accountable for your injuries.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Blog

What Is My Case Worth in Colorado?

If you sustained injuries in a personal injury accident, you are likely pursuing a claim to recover compensation from the negligent party. Understandably, one of the most common questions prospective clients ask is, How much is my personal injury case worth? Determining your case value can be complicated in some situations. That is why you need an experienced Colorado personal injury lawyer at the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, who can help. To better understand what your case is worth, it’s essential to understand the factors that go into determining your case value. Injury Type and Severity One of the most important factors in determining case value is your injury type and severity. That means someone with a more severe injury in an accident will likely have a higher case value than someone with seemingly minor injuries. For example, an accident victim with brain damage and in the hospital weeks after the accident will have a higher value than someone with a sprained ankle that heals within a month. Cases involving victims with comparable injuries can still have very different resolutions. Imagine two victims who sustained a broken leg in similar accidents. In one case, the victim’s broken leg healed quickly with no residual pain complaints. The other victim had complications and will require additional surgery. The second victim’s case will likely be worth more than the first victim’s. Liability Liability plays a crucial role in determining your case value. Colorado is a modified comparative negligence state. That means you can still collect a portion of your damages even if you are partially at fault for your injuries. However, if you are 50% at fault or greater, you are barred from recovery. Your percentage of fault will reduce any potential settlement or jury award you receive. That means if a jury finds you 20% at fault, you could still collect up to 80% of your damages. However, if a jury finds you 55% at fault, you will collect nothing. Damages Your damages are the financial losses that you incurred as a result of the personal injury accident. They are both tangible and intangible. Your tangible losses are called economic damages. They include things such as your medical expenses, lost wages, property damage, etc. All these items have corresponding dollar amounts that you can calculate.  Non-tangible damages are called non-economic damages. They consist of more subjective value items like your physical pain and suffering, emotional anguish, loss of consortium, and more. When determining a demand amount for your case, your attorney will calculate your economic and non-economic damages together. Contact a Colorado Personal Injury Lawyer Determining your case value can be challenging in some instances. You need a skilled Colorado personal injury lawyer who has the expertise to estimate your overall damages accurately. At the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, our legal team has decades of experience recovering compensation for injured victims just like you. If you need to pursue a personal injury claim in Colorado, let us help. We know all the tactics and tricks that insurance companies use to reduce the value of your claim.   Suppose you received a settlement offer from the other party’s insurance company. In that case, you should always review it with an experienced attorney before agreeing to resolve your case or signing a release of all claims.  Contact the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, today to schedule an initial consultation to learn more about how we can assist you in a Colorado personal injury claim.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Wrongful Death

Average Settlement for Accidental Death in a Colorado Accident

After losing a loved one in a car accident, you may feel overwhelmed with the prospect of filing a wrongful death claim. You probably have several questions about the process, especially about the average wrongful death car accident settlement. While many sources claim to have accurate estimates for the average settlement, there are several aspects of wrongful death cases that they may ignore. Here is everything you need to know about the factors affecting your potential settlement and how our Colorado personal injury lawyers can help you pursue your claim. Is There an Average Settlement for Wrongful Death Claims in Colorado? Since most wrongful death cases have confidential settlements, it’s nearly impossible to determine an accurate average. While the average settlement amount for published cases may be easy to calculate, it doesn’t provide a realistic estimate. In addition, some cases may settle for as little as a few thousand dollars, while others may receive upwards of a few million. This not only greatly skews the average, but also shows that not all wrongful death cases follow the same pattern. Ultimately, the value of a wrongful death car accident settlement depends on the unique circumstances of the case. Elements of a Wrongful Death Car Accident Claim Much like any other personal injury claim, wrongful death requires the plaintiff to prove the liability of the defendant. There are different elements of proof that determine whether the plaintiff may seek damages, including: Duty of care, Breach of duty, Causation, and Proof of damages. Proving each of these elements may be difficult without the help of an experienced Colorado wrongful death attorney. This is why it’s important to seek legal representation as soon as possible in the claims process. Damages in a Wrongful Death Car Accident Settlement In Colorado, the law divides wrongful death losses into two categories: economic and non-economic damages. Each category includes a variety of losses sustained by the family of the deceased. Economic damages refer to the actual financial losses related to the death. This typically includes things like funeral expenses, potential future earnings of the deceased, and more. In essence, economic damages must be tangible expenses with a standard economic value. There is also no limit to the amount of economic damages awarded in Colorado wrongful death cases. Non-economic damages are more difficult to calculate than economic damages. These losses are intangible and subjective, including but not limited to: Emotional distress, Mental anguish, Loss of companionship, Loss of consortium, and Loss of support and guidance. Colorado is one of the few states that places a limit on non-economic damages for a wrongful death car accident settlement. The state adjusts the cap every two years based on inflation. The cap for accidents occurring between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2021, is $613,760. The only exception is for wrongful death cases arising from a felonious killing, such as manslaughter or murder. In cases like this, the damage cap does not apply. Contact Our Colorado Wrongful Death Attorneys No matter what the circumstances may be, wrongful death is incredibly devastating for families. At the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, we believe that families who lose a loved one due to the negligence of another person deserve justice. Whether you need money to cover the deceased’s medical bills, funeral costs, or lost income, our attorneys fight for your family’s best interests.  If you lost someone you love to an accident or other incident, contact us online or call us at 303-665-2929. We offer free consultations to all potential clients and manage your case from start to finish. 

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Blog

Defining Motorized Bicycle Laws in Colorado

With the popularity of motorized bicycles on the rise, it’s becoming more common to see individuals involved in motorized bicycle accidents. Despite being a relatively new form of transportation, Colorado has a law distinguishing motorized bikes from other types of vehicles. Here is everything you need to know about Colorado motorized bicycle laws and what our personal injury attorneys can do if you get injured on a motorized bike. Motorized Bicycle Definition According to the Colorado DMV, a motorized bicycle is any vehicle with the following characteristics: Two or three wheels; An automatic transmission; and A cylinder capacity not exceeding 50cc OR a wattage not exceeding 4,476 watts. Most motorized bicycles and scooters fit into this category. Unlike motorcycles, motorized bicycles do not require a special license to operate. However, you need to register your motorized bicycle if you want to use it on public roads. Registration costs $5.85 for three years, and you must provide proof of insurance and proof of ownership. Are There Any Special Safety Requirements Under Colorado Motorized Bicycle Laws? Just like regular vehicles, there are certain safety precautions you must follow when riding a motorized bicycle. Under CRS 42-4-109, drivers of motorized bicycles must: Ride on the permanent seat attached to the bike; Carry only the amount of passengers specified by the vehicle manufacturer; and Avoid attaching their motorized bicycle to another vehicle on the roadway. Depending on the city, there may also be extra safety measures, such as headlights, reflectors, or the use of a horn or bell.  Can You Drive a Motorized Bicycle on the Highway? Motorized bicycles can only be used on city streets and in residential areas. They aren’t permitted on any highway, interstate, or limited-access road unless that road permits bicycles. While you must follow the same rules of the road in a motorized bicycle as a full-sized vehicle, there are a few differences. For example, under CRS 42-4-109(5), a motorized bicycle must ride “as close to the right side of the roadway as practicable.” However, you must obey all other traffic rules, such as stoplights, stop signs, speed limits, and directions.  What If I Get into a Motorized Bicycle Accident? If you sustain an injury in a motorized bicycle accident, you may be able to make a claim against the driver responsible. To do this, you must identify the person who caused the crash and file a claim with their auto insurer. During your claim, you may seek a variety of damages including medical bills, vehicle damage, lost wages, and more. If the insurance company gives you any trouble during your claim, we highly recommend talking to one of our Colorado personal injury attorneys. Need Help Understanding Motorized Bicycle Laws in Colorado? Contact Us Today At the Tenge Law Firm, LLC., we understand how difficult it is to navigate Colorado motorized bicycle laws after an accident. We help clients who were injured due to someone else’s negligence pursue the compensation they need to recover after an accident. Unlike other injury firms that assign their cases to paralegals, we take a personalized approach. Our attorneys work directly with clients. We take the time to get to know you and the details of your situation because it gives us the best chances of getting you the money you deserve. To schedule a free consultation, contact us online or give us a call. We proudly represent clients throughout Colorado from our offices in Boulder, Denver, and Fort Collins.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Blog

Contributory Negligence and Comparative Negligence: What’s the Difference?

Outside of the legal world, not very many people are familiar with the concepts of contributory and comparative negligence. At first glance, you might even think that they are just two different words for the same thing. However, as anyone in the legal community would quickly tell you, they are not the same. In fact, understanding how comparative negligence and contributory negligence differ is critical in the civil claims process. A misunderstanding of these concepts could easily leave you confused during the pendency of your case.  At Tenge Law Firm we try to give our clients all of the tools necessary to understand and fully participate in the legal process. We find we get better results that way, so we put together this quick guide on contributory vs comparative negligence. Contributory Negligence vs Comparative Negligence Contributory negligence and comparative negligence are terms that describe the attribution of liability and its effect on recovery in a given legal claim. In other words, both terms represent different ways to figure out who is responsible for what damages, and to what degree? Different states use different rules to answer these questions. Colorado uses what we call a modified comparative negligence system.  Another name we give to these concepts is “fault systems.” So if you hear or read about “contributory fault” or “comparative fault,” know that the writer or speaker is referring to these same systems. Contributory Negligence Systems Some states use contributory negligence to determine who can recover damages in any type of personal injury case. In these systems, only a plaintiff who is entirely free from negligence and fault can recover damages. In other words, if your state operates under contributory negligence rules, then you cannot recover any damages at all if you are even 1% at fault for your injuries. You must have zero fault to recover damages from the other party. Colorado does not utilize contributory negligence. Comparative Negligence Systems In contrast, comparative negligence systems compare each party’s percentage of fault in their negligence assessment. Afterward, each party’s degree of fault corresponds with a reduction in the amount of damage they can claim.  To illustrate, consider the following car accident scenario. Imagine that party A is 75% at fault for an accident while party B is only 25% to blame. Party B can recover damages from party A, but they will see a 25% reduction in their overall recovery. Similarly, party A can claim compensation from party B, but their damage claim will be subject to a 75% reduction.  So if the total damages to party A equal $100,000, this amount would be reduced by 25%, and their actual recovery from party B would be $75,000. Keep this example in mind as we delve further into comparative negligence. Pure Comparative Negligence vs Modified Comparative Negligence States typically employ comparative negligence systems in one of two ways:  Pure comparative negligence systems; and Modified comparative negligence systems. In a pure comparative negligence system, regardless of how great a percentage of fault a party bears, if the other party is not 100% at fault, they can still recover some damages. Someone 95% to blame for an accident in a pure comparative fault system can still recover 5% of the damage they suffered. Colorado does not use pure comparative negligence. Instead, we use a modified comparative negligence system. In such modified systems, there is a maximum threshold of blame beyond which a claimant cannot recover damages. In Colorado, this maximum is 50%, but other states may use 40% or 51%. Because of this, someone who is 95% at fault for a car accident cannot recover any damages under Colorado’s modified comparative negligence rules. Nor could party A who was 75% at fault in the first outlined situation. Are You Ready to Recover the Damages You Deserve? If you are ready to file a claim and recover the damages you are owed, Tenge Law Firm can help you from start to finish. If you have questions about modified comparative negligence liability, we can answer those questions for you. In situations where there are more than two plaintiffs, it isn’t always easy figuring out who is responsible for what damages. That’s exactly why we are here, and that’s exactly why we practice law. Our team is standing by to help you get the legal support you need with as little a hassle as possible. Contact Tenge Law Firm today for a consultation!

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| Read Time: < 1 minute | CO Accident News

Four Teenagers Killed in Truck Accident in Prowers County

[September 08, 2021 – Wiley, CO] — Four teenagers died in a two-vehicle truck accident in Prowers County. The vehicles collided at Highway 287 and County Road 196 after dark. The four victims, along with another teenager, were riding in an SUV. The SUV ran a stop sign at the intersection, and a semi-truck struck the vehicle. The Colorado State Patrol responded to the crash scene. Authorities transported the one teenager who survived the accident to a hospital in a helicopter. The truck accident also injured two other people, both of whom were riding in the semi-truck. Emergency responders took both of those people to the hospital. Medical personnel released one of the individuals, but the other sustained more serious injuries and required more treatment. The teenagers in the SUV were all between 15 and 16 years old. Although they have not been identified by name, the Wiley School District said that multiple students from Wiley School were involved in the crash. The CSP is investigating the truck accident in Prowers County. At this time, they do not believe that drugs or alcohol were factors in the collision.  Our deepest condolences go out to the families of the victims of this horrible incident. If a family member would like the name of a person removed for any reason, please click the “Remove Post” link. REMOVE POST. Sources: CBS Denver

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Accident Reports

How Long Does It Take to Get a Police Report After a Car Accident

Regardless of whether you were at fault in a given accident, you should always have a copy of your accident report. Accident reports are essential in the claim process because they are the official record of the accident. Without an accident report, the claim’s process would quickly devolve into hopelessly conflicting versions of what happened with no way to answer the question of who is liable for what damages. People often wonder how long it will take to get their accident report. Unfortunately, it is hard to provide an accurate estimation. How to Get a Police Report for a Car Accident To get your accident report, you need to go through the law enforcement agency that responded to your accident. For accidents on Colorado freeways, you need to contact the Colorado State Patrol. If your crash was within city limits, like Boulder, for example, you submit your request through that city’s police department. Finally, if your accident occurs outside of city limits and a local sheriff’s department responds to the scene, you need to submit your accident report request through them. Every jurisdiction follows a slightly different protocol, but they are all easily navigable.  How Long Does It Take to Get a Copy of a Police Report? Different jurisdictions list different ranges of time that their accident reports take. There is no set standard among the different Colorado law enforcement agencies. Most of the time, accident reports take between two and four weeks to reach their recipient, but sometimes it takes longer. Because police departments can’t always accurately estimate how long a given report will take to reach its destination, they don’t offer any sort of guarantee as to when a given report will arrive. Law enforcement agencies need time to file and process accident reports before they are available to the relevant parties. For some departments, this means that an accident report is not available until 14 days after it is filed, while other departments may require 10 days. Regardless, you should not expect to have your accident report in hand until at least 10-14 days have passed. Why Is My Accident Police Report Taking So Long? Having a delay between when you request your accident report and when you receive it is not an uncommon occurrence. This delay can make an already frustrating situation even worse. The accident report is essential in the claim process. If you don’t know what’s on the accident report, you will have a hard time presenting your claim. So why do accident reports sometimes get delayed? The truth is, in large bureaucratic organizations like police departments, a number of things can create delays in getting documents out to the people who request them. Those documents, of course, include your car accident report. You can always expect some degree of variation between the time you request your document and the time it is supposed to arrive. This variation goes both ways. If the number of pending document requests is fairly low when you submit your request, you may get your report a few days early. But if the staff tasked with responding to requests have a backlog of requests to get through before yours, it may arrive late. This variation is exactly why most police departments are reluctant to promise or guarantee  How to Ensure You Get Your Accident Report As Soon As Possible Most of what determines how long it will take for you to receive your accident report is entirely out of your control. Thus, there isn’t much you can do to get your accident report sooner. But there is one thing entirely under your control: submitting your properly completed request as soon as possible. That way, you won’t lose your spot in the line. Equally important is to properly fill out your document request. If the request is missing information and has to come back to you, your request will go to the back of the line. Outside of this, there isn’t much you can do to make things go quicker. Now That You Have Your Accident Report With your accident report in hand, you can start the process of recovering your damages and moving on from the accident. The best way to do that is with an experienced car accident attorney. Fortunately, the team at Tenge Law Firm is just that: experienced. Every day, we help our clients move forward from the trauma that comes with a nasty car accident. We treat our clients with respect and compassion, and we do everything we can to get them the best results. To see if Tenge Law Firm is the right fit for you, contact us today to get started!

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Get an Accident Report from the Loveland Police Department

Regardless of what direction you think your Loveland car accident claim will go, you should always have a copy of your Loveland, Colorado police report. The truth is, you never know what direction your claim might take. Your Loveland police report is the official record of your accident, so you need to know what’s on it to properly pursue your claim and protect your interests. Because requesting Loveland police reports is not something that you would do on a regular basis, you might not know how to request them. Luckily, the process of requesting Loveland accident reports is fairly straightforward. Once you have your Loveland accident report, Tenge Law Firm can help you take the next steps. Requesting Your Loveland Accident Report If your accident probably occurred within Loveland city limits, the responding officer will have filed your accident report with the department’s records division. You will need to submit your request to the records division. There are two main ways that you can go about requesting Loveland accident reports: in person or via mail, email, or fax. In-Person Requests You can submit your Loveland accident report request form in person at the Loveland Police Department’s physical headquarters. Their office is located at 810 E.10th Street, Suite 100, Loveland, CO 80537. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 5 PM. These hours may exclude holidays. If your report is available, the turnaround time for an in-person request might be as little as 20 minutes. Email Mail and Fax Requests To submit a request online, through the mail, or via fax, you first need to fill out a Records Request Form. After you fill out the necessary information, you will submit the request. You can fax your request to 970-962-2916, email it to records@cityofloveland.org, or mail the request to the department’s records division at 810 E.10th Street, Suite 100, Loveland, CO 80537. If you have questions about filling out and submitting the request form, you can always call LPD at 970-962-2267. Loveland Accident Reports: Cost and Timeline It is important to keep in mind that your accident report is not available for up to 14 days after an accident. This time is necessary for the police department to review the information and properly file it. There is no charge for reports 20 pages or less. The fee for reports over 20 pages is $5.00, with an additional cost of 0.25$ for every additional page. Let Tenge Law Firm Help Get You the Settlement You Deserve To increase your chance for success with your Loveland car accident claim, call Tenge Law Firm for some of the most experienced and personalized representation that Loveland has to offer. We are proud of our five-star ratings all around the web. Our previous clients rate us five out of five stars on websites like Lawyers.com, Yelp, Google Reviews, and even Avvo. You can read about our success stories on our client reviews and case results pages. If you think we are a good fit for your individual legal needs, let us see what we can do to help you. Contact us today for your free consultation!

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Accident Reports

Step-By-Step How to Get a Longmont Accident Report

Being in an accident is a traumatic experience, especially if you receive an injury. Once you are safe, you may not know where to begin with your claim. If you sustained an injury in an accident in Longmont, your first step in filing a claim is to get a copy of your Longmont accident report. This report not only provides details about the accident to the insurance company but also includes information from the officer’s preliminary investigation. At Tenge Law Firm, our personal injury attorneys can help you get a copy of your report. What’s Included in Longmont Accident Reports Accident reports contain valuable information about everyone involved in an accident. It’s usually filled out by the responding police officer and includes any evidence they find at the scene, such as: The date and location of the accident; Damage to all vehicles involved; Road conditions and weather hazards; and Photographs, diagrams, and sketches of the collision. For this reason, the accident report serves as an essential piece of evidence in your claim. How to Obtain a Copy of My Longmont Accident Report The first thing you should do is call the Longmont Police Department to see if they filed your accident report. In many cases, it may take up to two weeks for the officer to file the report. You may check your Longmont accident report’s status with the report number provided by the officer. If you had to leave the scene due to a medical emergency, you may call the police department to get the report number. Once your Longmont accident report becomes available, there are two ways to get a copy, either in person or by mail.  In Person If you want to get a copy of your Longmont accident report today, you can visit the Longmont Department of Public Safety Records Window. When you go, make sure to bring a valid form of ID. Each copy costs $5.25 for the first page and $0.25 for each additional page. Longmont Department of Public Safety Records Unit Safety and Justice Building 225 Kimbark Street Longmont, CO 80501 Phone: 303-651-8502 Hours: Monday-Friday, 7 AM-6 PM Mail To receive your accident report by mail, you must first call the Longmont police to check the status of your accident report. If it’s available, you can mail a crash report request form with payment to the Longmont Department of Public Safety at the address listed above. Currently, the Longmont Police Department accepts payments only in the form of cash or check.  Need Help Getting Your Longmont Accident Report? If you have any questions about requesting your Longmont accident report or need help finding it, we can help. Our experienced personal injury attorneys can answer any questions you may have about your claim or locating your report. To schedule a free case review or speak with a Tenge Law Firm attorney, give us a call or contact us online. We proudly serve clients throughout Colorado from our offices in Denver, Boulder, and Ft. Collins.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Accident Reports

Castle Rock Accident Reports: Steps to Get Your Report

When you get into a crash, the responding police department usually files an accident report. This report not only includes details about the aftermath of the accident but also serves as an important piece of evidence in your claim. At Tenge Law Firm, our car accident attorneys can help locate your Castle Rock accident report immediately after your crash. Ways to Obtain Castle Rock Accident Reports If the Castle Rock Police Department responds to your accident, there are a few different ways to get a copy of your report. Even if you can’t visit the department in person, you may obtain a copy online or through mail, email, or fax. Online For convenience, the Castle Rock Police Department offers digital copies of accident reports online through LexisNexis. This system allows you to look up Castle Rock accident reports made on or after November 1, 2014.  To find your accident report, you must select the Castle Rock Police Department under Jurisdiction and enter one of the following: The accident report number, Your last name and the date of the crash, or Your last name and the location of the crash. Keep in mind that your report may not be available until 24 hours after the accident. If you can’t find your report after three business days, try contacting the Castle Rock Police Department Records Unit. In Person If you want to get a copy of your Castle Rock accident report in person, all you need to do is visit the department. Here is their address: Castle Rock Police Department Attn: Records Unit 100 Perry Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 Hours: Monday-Friday, 8 AM-5 PM In-person requests for Castle Rock accident reports take about three business days to process. Make sure to also bring a copy of your state-issued ID or driver’s license. By Mail, Email, or Fax For those who can’t get their accident report online or in person, the Castle Rock Police Department accepts requests through mail, email, and fax. For each of these options, you must fill out a Request for Criminal Justice Records Search Form. Currently, the Castle Rock Police Department accepts cash, check, or credit card for records requests. The charge is $3.00 per copy plus $1.00 for each additional page. If you’re mailing your request, fill out the form and provide cash or check in the envelope. You may send it to the same address listed above. To make your request for your Castle Rock accident report by email or fax, send the form to one of the following: Fax: 303-663-6105 Email: PoliceRecords@CRgov.com If you have any questions about your accident report, call the Castle Rock Police Department Records Unit at 303-663-6104.  Need Help Getting Your Castle Rock Accident Report? Call Us Today At Tenge Law Firm, we know that locating the evidence necessary for your claim may be difficult during recovery. If you need help locating your Castle Rock accident report, contact one of our car accident attorneys today. We also offer free case reviews and work on a contingency fee basis, which means you owe us nothing unless we recover compensation. 

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