| Read Time: 2 minutes | Articles

How Long Do You Have to Report an Accident in Colorado?

A Colorado auto accident triggers at least two different deadline clocks that begin ticking as soon as the crash occurs. The first clock is the deadline for reporting the accident to the police. The second deadline is the deadline for filing a lawsuit against the responsible party.  Below, the experienced car accident lawyers at Tenge Law Firm go over the details about how long you have to report an accident in Colorado. If you have any questions, contact us today to schedule a free consultation. When Are You Required to File an Accident Report? Colorado law requires you to file an accident report for any accident that causes injury or property damage. In other words, you must file an accident report for any accident, even a fender bender. Today, most people use their cell phones to file the report verbally. You must also provide the other driver with your name, phone number, and insurance information. How Long Do You Have to Report an Accident?  Colorado law also requires you to report the accident to the police immediately. Of course, this might not be possible if you are seriously injured. If the police come to the scene of the accident, they will not file a police report unless there are injuries or property damage above $1,000. The police must file a report, however, if one of the drivers cannot provide proof of insurance. But what if you are unable to file an immediate report, and if the police do not come to the accident? In that case, you must file an online report with the Colorado DMV within 60 days of the accident. Remember that if you file an accident report because no police officer arrived at the scene of the accident, the police will not file a report at all. The Police Report as Evidence of Your Claim If you have a personal injury claim, you are probably going to need to obtain a copy of the police report. You will need a copy of the police report to investigate and evaluate your claim. You also need it so you know what testimony to expect from the police officers who responded to the accident. Nevertheless, you cannot use an accident report as evidence at trial, because Colorado law considers accident reports to be inadmissible hearsay. Instead, you are expected to testify personally, and you can call a police officer as a witness at trial. That way, both parties have a chance to cross-examine anyone making statements about the accident. The “Other” Deadline: The Statute of Limitations Deadline In Colorado, you generally have three years after the date of an accident to file a lawsuit. Speak to your lawyer, however, because certain limited exceptions sometimes apply. If you miss the statute of limitations deadline, your claim will likely become worthless, even at the negotiating table. So don’t wait until the last minute to call a lawyer一get started early. We Are Ready for Action Here at Tenge Law Firm, we have recovered over $50 million for our clients over the past 10 years alone. In fact, we have procured many seven-figure verdicts and settlements for our clients. Contact us online immediately or call (303) 536-7686 for a free, no-obligation consultation.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Blog

Do You Have an “Actionable” Personal Injury Case?

If you have been injured and believe someone else is to blame, you may wonder whether you have a personal injury case. Your civil claim, to be successful, must have several elements. Colorado law makes it possible to seek compensation for accident-related expenses, but if you are partially responsible for what occurred, resolving your case can be more complicated – which is why you need a strong attorney on your side. What Are the Elements in a Strong Personal Injury Lawsuit? The elements that must be present in a successful lawsuit are as follows: Duty of Care: This is the legal concept that another person owes you a reasonable duty to protect you from harm. This concept is wide-reaching and includes duties such as operating a vehicle in a manner that will not endanger others sharing the road, or keeping premises in a safe condition, or selling commercial items that do not have hidden risks, and many others. Breach: When the duty of care is breached – for example, by a driver operating a vehicle while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or by a retail outlet failing to clean up spills – that is known in legal terms as “negligence.” Causation: The person’s actions (or failure to act) must be established as being the cause of your injuries. This is proven by “the preponderance of the evidence.” You must have supporting evidence and testimony establishing that your injuries are the result of the negligent actions of the defendant. Damages: To seek compensation, you must be able to prove you suffered actual losses, both economic and non-economic. Medical bills, hospital records, missing time from work, loss of ability to enjoy your life, and other evidence may be presented by your lawyer. How Much is My Case Worth? Every personal injury case is unique. The amount pursued in a lawsuit is established through research, with the help of professionals such as financial experts, medical experts, and mental healthcare experts. If you are found to be partially responsible for what happened, your amount of compensation may be reduced by your percentage of fault (as decided by a jury). This is called comparative negligence, in Colorado. In one case, we represented a woman who was hit by another vehicle that crossed the center line. She suffered injuries to her lower legs, foot, and ankle was hospitalized, and had to undergo several surgeries. Our team at the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, found three insurance policies owned by the negligent party and was able to recover $1.35 million in compensation for her – the maximum payout on all three policies. The entire process required far more than just filing an insurance claim; we needed to find all of the insurance policies held by the negligent party, and craft a case that was both compelling and revealed the full extent of the damages. We have recovered millions of dollars in damages over our years in practice and always pursue the maximum possible amount. What is your case worth? The first step is to speak with us in a free case consultation so we can advise you about what to expect in damages. Why Legal Skill Is Critical in Personal Injury Lawsuits A personal injury lawsuit is filed in civil court. Each side presents its case. The defendant’s lawyer will engage in various strategies to diminish the value of your damages. They may seek your medical records to try to prove you already suffered from some physical condition, or try to prove that you were, in part, responsible for what occurred. Settling a personal injury case successfully requires more than a thorough understanding of the law. How we tell your story, how we present the facts of the case, is a critical point in winning over a jury. They need to understand how the injury has affected your life and future. That’s where the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, excels. If you believe you have a personal injury case, your first step is to speak with a qualified, experienced attorney. At the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, we provide legal services on a contingency fee basis – you owe us no fees unless we win. We have a strong record of success and over 25 years of experience in personal injury law. Call us at (303) 665-2929 to get straightforward facts from a legal team with a reputation for excellence.

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| Read Time: 2 minutes | Blog

Wrongful Death: Who Can File a Claim in Colorado?

A “wrongful death” is the death of a person that was caused by the wrongful act of another. Wrongful acts include negligence, such as careless driving, or intentionally harmful acts, such as assault and battery. After a person dies in this manner, legal action can be brought against the responsible party in civil court, to compensate the family of the victim. This type of lawsuit is known as a wrongful death claim. Who Can File a Wrongful Death Claim in Colorado? Only certain people can file a wrongful death claim, within certain time restrictions under Colorado wrongful death statutes. First Year In the first year after the person dies, a claim may be brought by the surviving spouse of the deceased. Upon the written election of the surviving spouse, a claim may also be brought by the spouse and heirs of the deceased, or by the heirs alone. If the person who died left no surviving spouse, a claim may be brought by the heirs or by the designated beneficiary. Second Year In the second year after the death, any of the following may file a wrongful death claim: Spouse of the deceased Heirs of the deceased Spouse and heirs of the deceased Designated beneficiary of the deceased When Can Parents File a Wrongful Death Claim? If the deceased person has no surviving spouse and no surviving children, the parents of the deceased may file a claim within two years of the person’s death. When a child is the victim of wrongful death, the parents may file a claim. Both parents will have an equal interest in the judgment. If either parent has died, the surviving parent will have an exclusive interest in the judgment. How Long Does the Family Have to File for Wrongful Death? The statute of limitations (time limit imposed by law) is two years in Colorado. A claim not filed within that time period will be forever barred. Family members who have lost a loved one through someone else’s negligence should begin the process as soon as possible to ensure this does not happen. What Damages Can Be Claimed for Wrongful Death? Damages for the wrongful death of an adult may include: Medical expenses for the final illness or injury of the deceased Funeral and burial expenses Loss of the deceased person’s income and services Pain and suffering (this is capped at $250,000) Loss of companionship and emotional loss (also capped at $250,000) The damages parents are entitled to claim for the wrongful death of a child are typically limited to their financial damages, as children usually have no income and have not contributed significantly to the household. Colorado allows for punitive damages (designed to punish the defendant) in cases when death was caused by willful or reckless actions. What Are the Caps on Wrongful Death Damages in Colorado? Under state law, non-economic damages are capped in Colorado. With certain exceptions, the cap on pain and suffering is $250,000. In medical malpractice cases, Colorado allows a total of $1 million in damages, but no more than $300,000 for pain and suffering. If there is no surviving spouse of a wrongful death victim, total damages are capped at $250,000 (or $500,000 with clear and convincing evidence that it is justified), or at $300,000 if wrongful death resulted from medical negligence. Wrongful death claims can be complicated in Colorado. If you have lost a loved one through the wrongful act of another, call the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, at (303) 665-2929 to speak with a Boulder personal injury lawyer. We are a full-service firm with the knowledge, skills, and resources to effectively handle your case.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Get a Colorado Police Report After an Accident

Know When You Need to File a Police Report In Colorado, almost every vehicle collision must be reported to the police. A law enforcement officer will typically come to the scene, gather evidence, call in medical services if necessary, and file a report on what happened. You may think a minor accident is no big deal and there is no reason to involve the police, but not all injuries show up right away, and it’s important to document the facts. Once law enforcement arrives, they might talk to you and make a statement, and knowing what to say can help you in the long run. You can lose out on potential compensation if you say the wrong thing to a police officer. If you have questions or need immediate assistance, please contact us online or call (303) 665-2929 for a free consultation. When Is It Necessary to Call the Cops After a Crash? You are required, by Colorado state law, to notify the police of a crash when there is any property damage or anyone is injured or killed. There is no minimum value on the property damage that must be reported. You must remain at the scene until a police officer arrives, and the officer may or may not interview you about the incident. What Should I Say to the Police? When you are asked questions by a police officer at the scene of an accident, you should answer those questions honestly. Lying to a police officer or attempting to mislead them about something that happened can have serious legal consequences. So always answer questions honestly, but keep your answers short. Do not ever admit guilt or say an accident was your fault. The scene is still under investigation, and you don’t know what other factors contributed to the crash, or what the other driver was doing. A police officer can only include things in a report that he or she sees or hears directly. The police can provide information about the evidence on the scene, but cannot say who caused the collision if they did not see it. If you tell an officer that you caused an accident, however, then he can repeat that and include it in his report. Will the Police Officer File an Accident Report? In Colorado, police officers usually file a crash report if there is property damage in excess of $1,000 or someone was injured or killed. A report will be filed if one or more drivers involved did not have car insurance, but otherwise, the officer might not bother to make and file a report. In this case, you should file a personal accident report with the Department of Revenue within 60 days of the crash to make sure there is an official record of what happened. How Can a Police Report Help Me? If you file a personal injury claim against the driver who caused your collision, the information in a police report can be used to help your case. If the officer noticed the other driver seemed intoxicated or issued a citation for excessive speeding, it goes a long way to prove that driver’s negligence. A police report can also be helpful if the other driver admitted to fault for the collision at the scene, and changed his story later during a civil proceeding. What About Accident Alerts? Due to severe weather in Colorado, sometimes an “accident alert” will be issued for a certain area. During this time, police must still be called after an accident, but will not come to the scene unless certain requirements are met. In general, police will only come to a crash during an accident alert if: Someone is seriously or fatally injured, Alcohol or drug use is involved, Vehicles are disabled and need to be moved, There is a hit-and-run, and Public property is damaged. Regardless, you should always contact the police after a crash. A police report can help your lawsuit, but it is important that you do not say anything that can be used against you later. Contact Tenge Law Firm Today If you have had a serious injury accident and need legal help, feel free to call the Tenge Law Firm, LLC at (303) 665-2929 or send us an online message to discuss your situation.

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| Read Time: 4 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Determine Who Is At-Fault in a Colorado Car Accident

You may not understand the laws regarding car accidents in Colorado. Your first step in pursuing recovery for your injuries is asking the question, Is Colorado a no-fault state for car accidents? Today we will discuss Colorado’s status regarding fault and how that may relate to your accident case. If you’ve suffered injuries in a car accident, contact a skilled personal injury attorney to help you resolve your claim and recover your losses.  Is Colorado a No-Fault State for Car Accidents? Colorado is not a no-fault state for car accidents. As an at-fault state, Colorado residents may file a claim against responsible parties without having to meet a threshold amount of damages. Unlike Colorado, no-fault states require drivers to turn to their own insurance policies to recover for their losses. Only after your injuries reach a certain threshold may you file a claim to recover against the other driver. Therefore, Colorado offers advantages different from no-fault states. After a car accident, you are free to pursue a claim against the driver deemed to be at fault and recover your losses.   What Determines Fault in a Colorado Car Accident?  Colorado law provides that negligence determines who is at fault in a car accident. Negligence is proven by the existence of the following elements:  A duty of care was owed,  The negligent party failed to act in accordance with the duty of care,  A person was injured as a result of the negligent act.  All drivers in Colorado possess the duty to operate their vehicles responsibly. This responsibility includes following all traffic rules. Typical examples of negligent conduct resulting in car accidents include: Speeding;  Following another car too closely; Running red lights;  Failing to stop completely at stop signs; Failing to yield or merge safely into traffic;  Changing lanes in an unsafe manner; Allowing yourself to become distracted while driving in any way, including texting while driving;  Driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Various types of evidence can be used to support the determination of fault in a car accident. Additionally, you should always write down your immediate recollection of the events leading up to the accident if possible. Memories fade quickly. Promptly writing memories down or recording them in some way may refresh your memory later.  Police Report  Since fault matters in Colorado, a reporting police officer may assist in the determination of fault after a car accident. In these situations, a police officer observing a car accident will detail important information in their accident report. A reporting officer may decide fault. If they do, it provides strong support in any car accident claim.  Photographs If possible, try to take photographs of the car accident scene. Photographs should document damage to the vehicles involved and surrounding conditions including the road and weather. Witnesses  If any persons witness the accident, take down their names and contact information. A reporting police officer may interview these individuals and include their statements in the accident report as well. These witnesses may also testify as to their observations in court if your injury claim goes to trial.  Accident Reconstruction Contact an experienced personal injury attorney to review the circumstances surrounding your car accident. If you suffered injuries resulting from the negligent actions of another person, you have the right to recover your losses. A personal injury attorney works to gather facts and evidence to build a strong case to support your claim.  What Is No Doubt Liability? In certain situations, the law can presume fault in a car accident. Colorado refers to these car accidents as “no doubt liability” accidents. These accidents are difficult to argue against and often result in a quick settlement for injured parties. Examples of no doubt liability accidents include the following:  Rear-end accidents—When a driver hits the back of the car in front of them, the law presumes them to be at fault.  Backing up accidents—When a driver is backing up and causes a collision, they are at fault. Red Light Failure—Drivers that run red lights and subsequently cause an accident are almost always deemed to be at fault.  Left-Hand Turns—In situations where a driver makes a left turn in front of drivers going straight through their green light, they are at fault.  Impaired Driving—Drivers impaired by alcohol or drugs typically do not escape fault in an accident.  When you get into an accident, you may think you will be unable to escape fault. However, there may be circumstances where the collision was unavoidable and not your fault. Therefore, it’s important to speak to a personal injury attorney so they can assess the facts of your case and discuss your options.  How Do I Recover My Damages in a Colorado Car Accident? Colorado provides three ways for an injured party to recover after a Colorado car accident. These include: Filing a claim with their own insurance company; File a claim against the at-fault driver’s insurance provider; and File a personal injury lawsuit against the at-fault driver. Colorado follows the comparative negligence theory. Therefore, if the court finds you to be less than 50% responsible for a car accident, you may seek compensation for your losses. However, your percentage of fault is deducted from your recovery. If a court deems you to be at least 50% responsible for the car accident, you may not seek compensation. What Can I Recover After a Colorado Car Accident? Colorado permits recovery of damages because it is not a no-fault accident state. As a result, once fault has been determined, you may recover certain damages for your injuries and losses. Economic Damages Economic damages represent those quantifiable losses supported by medical bills and other receipts. Economic damages typically include: Medical expenses,  Vehicle damage,  Property damage,  Past and future lost earnings. Invoices, medical bills, pay stubs, and tax returns support claims for medical costs and past and future lost earnings. Therefore, when attempting to recover economic damages, it’s important to save all receipts and records.  Non-Economic Damages Non-economic damages represent subjective losses typically characterized...

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Wrongful Death

Colorado Wrongful Death Statute of Limitations: What to Know

If you lost a family member due to someone else’s negligence, you could be entitled to bring legal action. While no amount of money will bring your loved one back, it can help with the sudden and unexpected financial burden your family is facing. When someone causes another person’s death, the injured party can hold them responsible through a wrongful death lawsuit. However, you only have a limited amount of time to file. The Colorado wrongful death statute says you generally have two years from the date of death to bring a lawsuit. These claims can be challenging to pursue independently. You need a Colorado wrongful death lawyer who understands the challenges in these matters and will ensure you don’t inadvertently miss the statute of limitations for wrongful death in Colorado. While the general rule is two years from the date of death, some situations may alter the deadline. Working with an experienced attorney is the only way to verify that you file within the statute of limitations for wrongful death in Colorado. What Is the Colorado Wrongful Death Statute? The Colorado wrongful death statute is discussed under Colorado Revised Statutes Sections 13-21-201 through 13-21-204. It’s commonly referred to as the Colorado Wrongful Death Act, and it allows certain surviving family members the right to pursue legal action against the party who caused their loved one’s death. Not everyone can file a wrongful death lawsuit, nor is it available in every situation. For example, you can only file a wrongful death lawsuit if the deceased victim would have had legal grounds to file a personal injury lawsuit if they were still alive. Any legal defenses that would’ve applied in the victim’s personal injury lawsuit will still apply in a wrongful death case. For example, comparative liability or assumption of risk are defenses the other party’s insurance company may raise. Some of the most common personal injury situations that give rise to a wrongful death lawsuit include: Motor vehicle accidents; Large truck accidents; Motorcycle and bicycle accidents; Pedestrian accidents; Boating accidents; Slip and fall injuries; Construction site and other workplace accidents; Swimming pool accidents; Medical malpractice; and Defective products. Potential recovery under the Wrongful Death Act will vary based on the circumstances of the case. Who Can Bring a Wrongful Death Lawsuit in Colorado? Colorado law only allows certain people to file a wrongful death lawsuit in Colorado. Within the first year following the victim’s death, only a spouse is legally entitled to bring a wrongful death lawsuit. The deceased’s children can join the case, provided the spouse gives written consent. In the second year following the victim’s death, the children or the surviving spouse can bring a claim. If the deceased did not have a spouse or children, the victim’s parents could file a lawsuit. Recovery is limited to lineal descendants. Family members such as brothers, sisters, uncles, and aunts typically cannot bring a wrongful death lawsuit. The representative of the estate can also file a survival action. What Is the Difference Between a Wrongful Death Lawsuit and a Survival Action? A survival action differs from a wrongful death lawsuit in the type of damages they seek. With a wrongful death lawsuit, family members are seeking compensation for their own damages, such as: Funeral expenses; Loss of deceased’s services; Loss of financial support; Emotional loss of support; and Pain and suffering. With a survival action, the estate representative is pursuing damages that the deceased would have been able to sue for had they survived. These damages include their medical expenses and lost wages while still alive. However, damages such as pain and suffering or future loss of income, disfigurement, etc., are not available in a survival action because they do not survive the victim’s death. Damages Cap on Wrongful Death Cases in Colorado Colorado limits the amount of damages you can recover in a wrongful death case in some instances. For example, Colorado law doesn’t cap economic damages such as loss of financial support. But the law subjects non-economic damages, such as pain and suffering, to a maximum amount or “cap.” Currently, that figure is $571,870 for claims occurring on or after January 1, 2020. The legislature adjusts that figure every two years so the cap will increase again for claims accruing on January 1, 2022, or later.  The cap can vary in some situations. If the person died and had no surviving spouse, minor children, or dependent parents, then the law caps the total damages award. If the victim died due to a “felonious killing,” then all caps are lifted. Felonious killing is when the defendant is charged with first or second-degree manslaughter or murder.    Contact a Colorado Wrongful Death Lawyer If you fail to bring a lawsuit within the Colorado wrongful death statute of limitations, you could lose your family’s right to recovery. Please don’t risk your case by trying to handle it independently. Let the skilled legal team at the Tenge Law Firm, LLC help. We have three decades of experience representing grieving family members in Colorado wrongful death lawsuits. We have worked hard to earn the reputation as one of the finest personal injury law firms in Colorado and we will be there for you every step of the way. To learn more about how we can assist you with a Colorado wrongful death lawsuit, contact Tenge Law Firm, LLC., today.

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Get Your Accident Report in Boulder, Colorado

Dealing with the aftermath of a car accident can be a scary and overwhelming experience. When determining how to get the police report for a car accident in Boulder, Colorado, you may not know the first thing to do. Contact a personal injury attorney in Boulder to assist you in obtaining a copy of your Boulder accident report. This report serves as an important tool if you decide to pursue a lawsuit against the other party involved in your car accident. What Is a Boulder Accident Report? After a car accident, it’s important to assess that all involved parties do not require medical attention. However, even if you don’t notice any apparent injuries after a car accident, seek medical attention for the existence of any other less obvious injuries.  It’s advised to contact the Boulder Police Department after a car accident to assess the scene. A Boulder Police Department police officer creates a Boulder accident report based on their observations of the scene. These observations include the following details:  The date, time, and location of the car accident; Any potential causes of the collision; The names and contact information of the parties involved; Statements from witnesses and passengers in any vehicles; Description of injuries or property damage resulting from the car accident, and The conditions present at the scene of the accident including weather conditions and road conditions.  The police office then submits the Boulder Police report for the accident which may be obtained in the days following the accident. Be sure to contact the Boulder Police Department to check on the status of your car accident.  Need help with getting your crash accident report in Boulder? Give us a call at 303-665-2929 or submit a form so we can begin reviewing the case. How to Get Your Boulder Police Department Accident Report In the City of Boulder, there are three ways to request your car accident report. After the reporting office creates your Boulder Police Department accident report, call the Boulder Police Department at 303-441-4330 in the days following the accident to check on the status. Online You may request a copy of your Boulder Police report for your accident online at the City of Boulder website. The Boulder Police Department provides a form to complete, which can then be emailed to pdrecords@bouldercolorado.gov. Mail The City of Boulder also permits requests for accident reports completed by mail. The same Request for Police Report Form must be completed and mailed to the Boulder Police Department Records Unit at 1805 33rd Street, Boulder, Co 80301. You must also provide a self-addressed stamped envelope with a check for $5 for the first ten pages of the report and $0.25 for each additional page. In-Person You may also obtain a copy of your Boulder Police Department accident report in person at the Boulder Police Department located at 1805 33rd Street, Boulder, Co 80301. Be sure to bring money for payment of $5 for the cost of the Boulder accident report. The Records Department is open from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM Monday through Friday.  Why Is a Boulder Police Report Important?  When police report to the scene of your car accident, it’s important to thoroughly explain the details of what happened while those details remain fresh in your mind. The reporting officer should include your statements in the Boulder Police Department accident report. Additionally, a police report provides an unbiased account of a car accident. This is an official report detailing an officer’s observations after a car accident. In many situations, this official report provides more substantial evidence supporting fault than hearsay and eyewitness testimony, which may occur many months after the event.  Most importantly, some reporting police officers may assign fault in a car accident. This information in your Boulder Police report about your accident may be used as evidence to support your lawsuit against the other driver. Contact Us After a car accident, seek the assistance of a qualified personal injury attorney to evaluate your claim. At Tenge Law Firm, we provide aggressive and focused legal representation to clients in personal injury matters. One of the first steps after a car accident is obtaining a copy of your Boulder accident report. The attorneys at Tenge Law Firm enjoy a reputation as one of the finest personal injury firms in Boulder. We know what vital evidence supports your personal injury claim. We provide a free consultation, so contact the Tenge Law Firm today! 

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| Read Time: 4 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Get a Copy of Your Aurora Accident Report

Whenever you are in a car accident, whether you intend to file a legal claim or not, you should always get a copy of your accident report. The report is the state’s official record of what happened, so you should know what it says. On one hand, if you plan to file a legal claim, your Aurora, CO, accident report will help you to establish fault and plan your legal claim with your attorney. On the other hand, if you don’t plan to file a legal claim, your accident report could provide you with an indication as to whether or not the other party involved in the accident will file a legal claim against you. Whatever the case is, it is critical that you get a copy of your Aurora police accident report. Accident reports are often administrated at the city or county level. As a result, the protocol for obtaining accident reports often differs between jurisdictions. The process for obtaining copies of Aurora accident reports, for example, is different from the process in Denver. Read on for more information on obtaining a copy of your Aurora accident report. Do All Accidents Have an Accident Report? The vast majority of car accidents that happen in Colorado will have a related accident report. This is because accident reports are a legal requirement for most Colorado accidents. Drivers in Colorado are required to immediately report any accident to local law enforcement when any property damage occurs, or when any personal injury occurs. Practically every car accident causes some type of injury or property damage, even if minor. Failure to report an accident is punishable as a class two misdemeanor traffic offense. The penalty includes up to a $300 fine, up to 90 days in jail, or both. If it appears as though there is property damage of more than $1,000, or someone suffers an injury, law enforcement has a legal obligation to file an accident report. Similarly, if any party to an accident fails to provide proof of insurance, law enforcement must file a police report. If the accident you are in does not meet these qualifications, you can still ask for a police report. Law enforcement is legally obligated to file such a report if any party to an accident requests it. Thus, Aurora Colorado accident reports exist for the vast majority of Aurora car accidents.  Getting a Copy of Your Accident Report Getting a hold of a copy of your accident report isn’t too much of a hassle. Of course, who you get your accident report from will differ based on which law enforcement agency responds to your accident. If your accident occurs within Aurora city limits, the Aurora Police Department will have your Aurora accident report on file. Similarly, if your accident occurs on unincorporated county land or on a Colorado freeway, the local county sheriff’s office or the Colorado State Patrol will have your report. There are three ways to obtain copies of Aurora accident reports. Either: Through the mail; In person; or Online. The protocol for requesting your accident report differs depending on how you choose to make a request. We will explain each of these three methods. Through the Mail First, you can get a copy of your Aurora accident report through the mail. To do so, you need to download, print, and fill out a record request form. You can find the request form by clicking the “Request a Police Report” button on the Aurora government’s “Get a Police Report” webpage. Otherwise, this “Request a Police Report” link will take you to the form directly. To fill out the form, you will need to provide the following information:  Your name; Your contact information; The date, time, and location of your accident; The name and date of birth of anyone involved; The report number; and Your relation to the accident in question. If you need help finding any required information you can call the Aurora Police Records Unit at 303-739-6320 for assistance. Once you fill out the form, you can mail it, with payment, to Aurora Police Department; Attn: Records Section; 15001 East Alameda Parkway; Aurora, CO 80012. In Person You can also make your request in person. Requesting your Aurora accident report in person is helpful if you need help gathering all of the necessary information or filling out the form. You will need the same information as you would for a mail-in request. To make such a request, visit the Aurora Police Department’s Records division between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. from Monday through Friday. The address is the same as noted above. Online Requesting your Aurora accident report online is similar to requesting it through the mail. First, download the same form you would use for a mail-in request. Then, either fill the form out on your computer or print it, fill it out, then scan it to your computer. Finally, email the completed form to APDPublicRecordsRequest@auroragov.org. The police department will contact you for payment within the following 30 days. Paying for Your Accident Report No matter which method you choose, the cost is the same. The first 10 pages of a report will cost $7.55, plus $.025 per additional page. To pay for your request you can use cash, check, credit, or debit card over the phone or in person. If you need to fill out a personal check for the fee, the recipient should be “City of Aurora.” The City of Aurora warns that the turnaround for information requests, including Aurora, CO, accident reports, can take approximately 60 days. Once You Have Your Aurora Colorado Accident Report Once you have your Aurora accident report and are ready to file a legal claim, contact us at Tenge Law Firm. At Tenge Law Firm we have helped Coloradoans recover more than $50 million in damages in the last seven years alone. In one recent case, we were able to recover more than $1.1 million for our client. Our priority is giving our clients...

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Accident Reports

How to Obtain Your Lakewood Accident Report

Accident reports are a critical component of any car accident claim. The report is the official record of your accident. Thus, insurance agents, lawyers, juries, and judges will all use it to help adjudicate your claim. Because it is so important, it is crucial that you get a copy of your accident report before you file your claim. Filing a claim for a collision without an accident report in hand is a recipe for disaster. Without the benefit of an accident report, your lawyer may as well prepare your case’s legal strategy blind. To avoid any potential road bumps in your pursuit of a car accident claim, you need to know how to get a copy of your accident report. If your accident happened in Lakewood, your report will come in the form of a Lakewood, CO police report. Will My Crash Have a Lakewood Colorado Accident Report? If your accident occurs within Lakewood city limits, chances are that your collision will have a Lakewood Colorado police department accident report. There are a couple reasons for this. First, in almost all cases, drivers are required to report accidents to law enforcement. Second, in most cases, police are required to file an accident report for any collision they respond to. Thus, if the Lakewood police respond to your accident, you will most likely have a Lakewood Colorado accident report. On one hand, all drivers in Colorado are legally obligated to report any car accident where either property damage or personal injury occurs. Failure to report such an accident can result in a fine of up to $300, incarceration for up to 90 days, or both. On the other hand, state law requires law enforcement officers responding to traffic accidents to file collision reports for any accident where personal injury occurs or where property damage exceeds $1,000. For all intents and purposes, this includes just about any car accident. If the police respond to your accident and decide not to file a report, you can still request that they do so. If you make such a request, they are legally obliged to make the report. Obtaining Your Lakewood Colorado Police Report There are three ways that you can obtain a copy of your Lakewood accident report: Fax, Email, or Mail. Each of these methods works just as well as the others. The first thing you need to do to get a copy of your Lakewood collision report is to complete a records request form. Once you complete the form, send it in with a copy of your government issued ID, and the report will get to you within 3-7 business days. To submit your request, you can email it to LPDRecords@lakewoodco.org, mail it to 445 S. Allison Pkwy Lakewood CO, 80226, ATTN Records, or fax it to 303-987-7359. No matter the method by which you submit your request, you should always include a photocopy of your government issued ID. For help with filling out the form, you can call 303-987-7331 for assistance. Telephone services are limited at this time. Normally, there would be office hours, but as of July 2021, the records office is still closed to the public due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. For any request that you submit through email or fax, the Lakewood Police Department will contact you through email or fax to complete the payment. The cost is $8.00 for the first 10 pages, and $0.25 for every pager after 10. You can also indicate on your application that you would prefer to submit payment in person. If you make such a request, the Lakewood Police Department will get in touch with you to schedule a time. However, in-person services are still limited at this point, so there is no guarantee that they will accept your request. If they deny your in-person request, they will notify you with a phone call or email.  When You are Ready to File Your Claim Once you have your Colorado state police report from Lakewood, it’s time to get your claim started. After all, you don’t want to let the statute of limitations pass you up while you plan your legal strategy. So call Tenge Law Firm today. Our primary commitment is to provide Coloradans with the best legal representation possible. Whether your claim is large or small, we can help. We’ve helped our clients recover more than $50 million in the last 7 years alone, so let us see what we can do for you. You deserve specialized legal services because your case is just as unique and important as any other. Don’t just take our word for it. Check out our client reviews and case results pages to see how we help our clients. Then all you have to do is give us a call for your free consultation: we’ll take care of you from there on. Call us today for your free consultation!

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| Read Time: 3 minutes | Blog

Do You Want to Maximize Your Car Accident Settlement?

Car accidents are an unfortunate fact of life. These collisions are often the result of negligent driving conduct. If another driver caused your accident and injuries, you would naturally want to maximize your settlement. As an accident victim, you can take specific steps and avoid certain actions for a better chance of recovering a fair level of compensation. What Evidence Can You Record to Get a Higher Settlement? A good attorney will be able to launch an in-depth investigation into your case and find key pieces of evidence. That being said, there is information you can record after your accident that will help your attorney do their job. Various types of evidence are needed to support a successful claim. Some of the things you can hold on to for your claim include: Police report Witness statements Medical reports Physical evidence, such as pieces of the damaged automobile Pictures of the accident scene Photos of your car and the at-fault driver’s car Pictures showing your injuries Evidence that your injuries have worsened A daily log of your pain and suffering, including your symptoms and their duration Medical bills to document your costs for treatment Documents showing your income loss from time away from work Proof of expenses such as auto repairs, rental car costs, taxi service to and from the doctor, housekeeping, and in-home nursing All bills and receipts related to your accident A good rule of thumb is to keep all documents involved with your claim. Never throw away a bill, receipt, pay stub, or price quote. Anything that indicates the damages you have suffered should be safely stored away and then given to your attorney. What Steps Can Help You Get a Higher Settlement? Beyond holding on to all possible documentation, there are other key steps you can take to ensure that you receive as much compensation as possible. In our experience, clients who take an active role in their claims are likely to receive more. Some steps we recommend you follow are: Calculating a settlement: Have a settlement amount in mind before you begin negotiations. Do not reveal this number to the insurance adjuster. You should also not jump at the first offer you receive. It is likely lower than the insurance company is willing to go. Advocating for yourself: Emphasize emotional points in your favor, such as how painful the injury was and the long-term effects of the accident. Refer to pictures of severe injuries or your vehicle that was wrecked in the crash. Reveal how the accident and injuries have affected your life. Protecting your settlement: When negotiations are over, make sure the agreed-upon settlement is in writing. What Should You Avoid While Negotiating a Car Accident Settlement? That being said, there are also things you should avoid doing in the case of filing a personal injury claim. Insurance companies are quick to find anything they can use to tear you down and pay you as little as possible. In order to protect yourself and your compensation, you should: Keep important info to yourself: During your car accident settlement negotiations, do not release your medical records to the at-fault driver’s insurance company. Only your insurance company is entitled to your medical records. The other side could use that information against you. Never admit fault: Do not let an adjuster pressure you into settling your claim. Adjusters are skilled in various tactics for convincing you to accept less than your claim is worth. Do not admit fault for the accident, give a recorded statement, or sign anything from the adjuster. You should also never speak to an insurance adjuster alone. If one calls, inform them that they can speak with your attorney, and end the conversation there. Follow your doctor’s orders: Continue with your treatment until your doctor releases you. If you stop going to the doctor when you feel better, it can affect your case and the amount of your settlement. Who Should You Speak with Concerning Your Claim? Instead of talking to insurance adjusters, consult with an experienced lawyer about your claim. Our Boulder personal injury attorney at the Tenge Law Firm, LLC, can investigate your accident to determine fault and liability and collect and preserve evidence to support your claim. We have the knowledge and resources to assess the full extent of your losses and the full value of your claim. We can negotiate skillfully with the insurance company on your behalf, so you won’t have to speak with an adjuster and risk damaging your case. When you have legal representation in a car accident case, insurance companies know they need to go through your lawyer to negotiate a settlement. We have recovered hundreds of millions of dollars for our clients. Call us at (303) 665-2929 to schedule a free consultation regarding your car accident settlement.

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